Hamburg
 


Jesko Fezer

Design ist politisch weil sozial. Jesko Fezer arbeitet als Architekt, Autor, Designer, Künstler und Ausstellungsgestalter. Er ist Professor für experimentelles Design and der Hochschule für Bildende Künste Hamburg.

Publikationen & Vorträge:

2012
Series edited by Jesko Fezer and Matthias Görlich.

In this text, Brenner, Peck and Theodore question the claim that neoliberalism has ended in the wake of the global economic crisis that began in September of 2008. The authors argue that this assumption rests upon an inadequate understanding of the reach and tenacity of the crisis-induced, market-disciplinary forms of regulatory restructuring that have accompanied the neoliberalisation of cities, regions and states across the world. In contrast with the over-simplified, monolithic conceptualisations of the global economy that prevail in many popular and academic accounts, the authors emphasise the constitutively uneven, institutionally hybrid and chronically unstable character of neoliberalism.

For urban designers, planners and activists working to promote more socially just and democratic forms of urbanism, Brenner, Peck and Theodore insist on the need to radically restructure the macroinstitutional ‘rules of the game’ that variously encourage and disallow localities, cities and regions to adapt to market-based approaches to (re)investment, collective-goods provisioning, and social reproduction. ‘Absent this’, they argue, ‘the potential of progressive postneoliberal projects will continue to be frustrated by the dead hand of market rule’.
2011
Series edited by Jesko Fezer and Matthias Görlich.

Reading the urban revolts and out-bursts of irrational violence preceding and following the crisis of neoliberalism as sings of discontent and of a desire for alterna-tive designs of the urban, Erik Swyngedouw reintroduces the idea of the (dead) polis as a space of political encounter. Techno-managerial policies of governing colonised the polis. Politics as dispute is replaced by the neoliberal, postdemocratic consensus. This condition, which designers of all kinds helped to shape, excludes disagreement and disavows conflict as the constitutive element of democratic politics.

For Swyngedouw, designing dissensus in the context of a post-political regime requires transgressing ‘the fantasy that sustains the post-political order’. It would strive to redesign ‘the urban as a democratic political field of dispute’ and to produce ‘common values and the collective oeuvre, the city’. While the city as polis may be dead, spaces of political engagement occur within the cracks, in between the meshes and the strange inter-locations that shape places that contest the police order. It is here that design, as a renewed political practice, can intervene.
2011
Series edited by Jesko Fezer and Matthias Görlich.

Rejecting the economically narrowed neoliberal definition of democracy, Gui Bonsiepe claims for the potential of design to promote democracy. Design and Democracy introduces a concept of design activities which aim to interpret the needs of social groups and to develop viable emancipative proposals in the form of material and semiotic artifacts. This short text is accompanied by an interview with the author and a reprint of early 1970s material from Chile.
2011
Series edited by Jesko Fezer and Matthias Görlich.

Tom Holert intends to reframe and re-imagine design in post-capitalist terms. By tracing the appearance of the term ‘design’ in contemporary critical theory he develops an optimistic micro-political approach, which tries to go beyond well-rehearsed figures of critique, namely, those accusing design of being complicit with capitalist commodification and, ultimately, exploitation.
2010
Series edited by Jesko Fezer and Matthias Görlich.

Margit Mayer looks at contemporary social movements that contest neoliberal urban development by invoking the Right to the City, a motto originally coined by Henri Lefèbvre in the 1960s. Mayer contrasts these new movements to those of previous phases in postwar, political-economic development, and thus establishes a set of correspondences between consecutive urban regimes and shifting forms of contestation. This framework helps to identify the novelty of progressive movements within the (post-)neoliberal city—as well as to explore ?the scope of meanings attached to their demand for the Right to the City, which has become such a defining feature of current urban struggles not just in the Euro-American core, but around the world. Social Movements in the (Post-)Neoliberal City discusses the implications of the current economic crisis for the Right to the City movements, and speculates about what these movements might imply for designing the (post-)neoliberal city.

The Civic City Cahier series intends to provide material for a critical discussion about the role of design for a new social city. It publishes short monographic texts by authors who specialise in urban and design theory and practice.

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